QSwharfth.jpg (4017 bytes)Manly Quarantine Station

Quarantine Station Lunch - February 2001

Aboriginal
Heritage

History
Immigration

Buildings
in 1999

Carvings
on site

Residents
in the past

Natural
Environment
Conservation
Plan

Quarantine Station Lunch - February 26th, 2001

Celebration at the Quarantine Station 


Guests arrived by boat as did most people in the past.


Hospital in the background.
QSAMadden.jpg (13865 bytes)
Alan Madden
Metropolitan Local Aboriginal
Land Council Representative
welcomed us to his country.

Rick Le Pastrier wearing a hat.
Editor of Manly Daily in yellow shirt
Emma Lee (wearing orange)
Aboriginal Heritage Consultant

Pictures distributed amongst the crowd show the raising of the Aboriginal flag on North Head on 25th Feb, 2001.


Tour Guide, Kathy Hart, shows rock where Cyclone Tracy is carved.


Jean Foley, historian gave a quick tour of some of the rock engravings.

Lunch - program

10:45  Board boats - travel to the Quarantine Station.

Neville Burkett
National Parks and Wildlife Service
Welcome 
on behalf of the National Parks and Wildlife Service.

Allen Madden 
Metropolitan Local Aboriginal Land Council

Welcome to Country 
on behalf of Aboriginal people. This is our land and we want you to feel welcome here.

Rick Le Pastrier,

Interim Sydney Harbour Federation Trust 

The Quarantine Station is unique in having important heritage for all people. It is also a place of healing.
If we fail to put these values above economic concerns then what sort of society are we creating? 
Tom Uren
former Member of Parliament.
The voices of the people MUST be heard. There are good reasons for objecting to privatisation of this place.
Tom Uren is pictured here in the boat as it approached the Quarantine Station.

Tom spent some time at the Quarantine Station during the second world war.

Click here to read about it.

Emma Lee
Aboriginal Heritage Consultant
This was a special place for Aboriginal people - it was the home of medicine men. There are human remains of a mother and child just here by the wharf. They were buried with ceremony.
On the other side of Quarantine Beach are human remains also but these were never buried. These Aboriginal people died from smallpox.

Two beaches away, is the site of the whale feast - it was the first meeting of Aboriginal and English people where Aboriginal women were present. It was the first formal contact where Governor Phillip and his men were invited to be present.

John Simpson
Master Builder
John handed photos around showing the raising of the Aboriginal flag on Old Man's Hat rock in honour of this occasion.
He quoted examples of where the Conservation Management Plan that was endorsed by the Heritage Council on April 14th, 2000, had been modified from the version which had been approved by the Reference Working Group.
Neville Burkett
National Parks and Wildlife Service, tried to answer the questions coming from the crowd.
People had the opportunity to ask questions about the process of preparing the Conservation Management Plans and having them modified or endorsed.
Questions were asked concerning Aboriginal involvement in the preparation of the Plans and about whether NPWS or the Heritage Council have statutory requirements to honour Aboriginal Heritage.

NPWS provided lunch during which more informal discussions took place between those concerned with the future of the Quarantine Station.


Thank you John Simpson for organising this day.

Aboriginal
Heritage

History
Immigration

Buildings
in 1999

Carvings
on site

Residents
in the past

Natural
Environment
Conservation
Plan
Tours
Bookings
Information
and links
This page was created 28th February, 2001, by Judith Bennett, Friends of Quarantine Station, and was last modified 20 January, 2007